POLLUTION REDUCTION

Nutrients and chemicals applied to farm fields and residential lawns find their way into our lakes and streams via stormwater runoff, which also delivers oils, greases, sand, road salt and litter from our city streets, parking lots and rural roads into surface waters. Excess nutrients, bacteria and chemicals can degrade wildlife habitat and water quality, sometimes to the point of being a human safety concern. By improving the way we collectively manage urban stormwater runoff, riparian buffer zones along lakes and streams and manage agricultural lands we can do a lot to project the quality of our water resources.

Stormwater

After rainfall events, stormwater runoff picks up and delivers oils, greases, sand, road salt and litter from our city streets, parking lots and rural roads into our rivers and lakes. Excess nutrients, bacteria and chemicals can degrade wildlife habitat and water quality, sometimes to the point of being a human safety concern. By improving the way we collectively manage urban stormwater runoff and the riparian buffer zones along lakes and streams we can do a lot to project the quality of our water resources.

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Rain falling in a forest soaks into the spongy soil, where it is either taken up by vegetation or allowed to filter slowly through the soil and replenish groundwater resources. But in developed areas stormwater is forced to flow over roads, parking lots and rooftops. Along the way it warms significantly and picks up sediment, chemicals, oils and greases and debris before entering concrete storm sewers that deliver this polluted water right into our streams. However, that does not need to be the case. Huron Pines has worked with communities like Grayling, Rose City and West Branch to plant rain gardens and retrofit storm sewer systems with mechanical oil and grit separators that have reduced stormwater pollution to our rivers and to the Great Lakes!

CHECK OUT: Rose City Stormwater Map
CONTACT: Watershed Project Manager Josh Leisen, josh@huronpines.org, (989) 448-2293 ext. 16

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Waterfront Buffer Zones

Greenbelts lead to improved water quality. Keeping a buffer of native vegetation along your waterfront benefits wildlife and water quality in many ways. Native vegetation buffers protects streambanks against erosion, filters pollutants and debris from stormwater runoff, keeps water temperatures cool by providing shade, promotes recruitment of woody habitat into streams, minimizes the risk of invasive species becoming established and helps attract both aquatic and terrestrial wildlife. Huron Pines works with landowners to enhance and restore waterfront buffers. Whether you have a cabin on the lake or operate a farm you can contact us for assistance in managing your waterfront for improved water quality and wildlife habitat.

CHECK OUT: Michigan Native Plants List
CONTACT:
Ecologist Jennifer Muladore, jennifer@huronpines.org, (989) 448-2293 ext. 31

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Agriculture & Conservation 

Nutrients and chemicals applied to farm fields find their way into our lakes and streams via stormwater runoff, which also delivers oils, greases, sand, road salt and litter from our city streets, parking lots and rural roads into surface waters. Excess nutrients, bacteria and chemicals can degrade wildlife habitat and water quality, sometimes to the point of being a human safety concern. By improving the way we collectively manage agricultural lands, urban stormwater runoff and the riparian buffer zones along lakes and streams we can do a lot to project the quality of our water resources.

Rifle Ag

Farmers understand the intimate link between healthy natural resources and a robust rural economy. Clean water supports food production as well as the outdoor recreational opportunities Northeast Michigan has to offer, and our stewardship of the land directly affects our water resources. Huron Pines offers cost-share opportunities for agricultural producers wanting to implement new practices designed to reduce pollutant inputs to our lakes and streams. Whether it livestock exclusion fencing, cover crops, riparian buffer restoration or other best management practices, Huron Pines can help! Please contact us to learn more.

CHECK OUT:
CONTACT: 
Watershed Project Manager Josh Leisen,
josh@huronpines.org, (989) 448-2293 ext. 16