HEALTHY HABITAT

What makes certain areas better habitat for wildlife than other areas? Different kinds of animals have different preferences and needs, but for all species habitat must provide food, water and shelter. Some animals need a larger area to keep a healthy population, some need certain age classes of forest and some travel between different habitat types during their lives. Huron Pines uses GIS technology to identify the best wildlife habitat “patches” based on things like size, plant diversity and connection to other patches. Then we work with public and private landowners to improve habitats in those core habitat areas and the paths between them.

Pigeon River Country Wildlife Habitat

Huron Pines takes an ecosystem approach to protecting and restoring wildlife habitat. Through activities like treating invasive species, restoring native plant communities and connecting wildlife corridors, we are sustaining diverse Michigan landscapes that support rare and threatened species along with our state’s prized game and nongame animals. Our organization has a unique ability to work with people across ownership boundaries to improve the health of private lands, conservancy preserves and state- or federally-held public lands. At the core of our work is a dedication to promoting wise stewardship of our most critical coastal and inland landscapes.

 

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To improve the long-term habitat and recreation opportunities for the Pigeon River Country State Forest (PRC), Huron Pines, Michigan DNR and other conservation partners are enhancing prairie and food plot complexes and treating aggressive invasive species surrounding “Inspiration Point” and a variety of oil and gas well sites. This work benefits a wide array of wildlife, especially elk, deer and game birds. The PRC is the heart of Michigan’s elk range and due to a range of factors the amount of open grasslands favored by elk has been decreasing, succeeding to forest over time. By improving and increasing open lands at the center of the PRC, this project will draw wildlife species away from the farmlands and major highways on the edges of the property, giving them food sources and providing viewing and hunting opportunities for people.

CHECK OUT: Pigeon River Country Concept of Management, Prairie Restoration Guide
CONTACT: 
Ecologist Jennifer Muladore,
jennifer@huronpines.org, (989) 448-2293 ext. 31

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Instream Habitat

Huron Pines takes an ecosystem approach to protecting and restoring wildlife habitat. Through activities like installing instream habitat structure, we are sustaining diverse Michigan river systems that provide refuge for fish and other wildlife. At the core of our work is a dedication to promoting wise stewardship of our most critical coastal and inland landscapes.

Often called “Large Woody Debris,” instream habitat is actually so much more. It includes complexes of rock, living and dead wood, overhanging plants and aquatic plants. These items serve as sources of food and shelter for the many species of fish, insects and other aquatic organisms that live in or near rivers. It is a dynamic system: when trees fall into the river naturally, they often move with high flows until they catch against a bank. In many streams in northern Michigan, much of this habitat was removed in order to facilitate the logging industry over 100 years ago. Huron Pines works with landowners of all types to help them manage their river banks. Through our holistic watershed restoration projects, we use an experienced crew to install instream habitat complexes like tree revetments in stretches of river that lack habitat. We also work to reduce erosion and promote native plant growth to provide more habitat.

CHECK OUT:
CONTACT: 
Watershed Coordinator John Bailey, john@huronpines.org, (989) 448-2293 ext. 19